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  • Had the bass drivers out yesterday so that I could experiment with some more bracing.
    Basically the insides of the cabinets now look like a Kerplunk tower ready for the balls to be dropped in. Into each cabinet I fitted 2 more side-to-side braces and 6 more front to back braces.
    Significant effect on sound. The midrange dropped away. So much so that I found it best to completely eliminate the L-pads on the midrange drivers and further trim back the tweeters a little.
    Now the cabinets are sounding tighter and more focussed. Stereo image is improved. Sounds more distinct; purer. With biggest improvements to upper bass and midrange.
    Fascinating to see how the cabinet and drivers interplay with each to produce an overall sound with the the room.
  • This is a fascinating saga, Ben.
  • Possibly an overstatement.
    But it does keep me off the streets.
  • edited May 21
    Nice, Ben.

    I've been idly toying with the notion of getting my loudspeaker cabinets rebuilt by someone with access to CNC facilities, is that something you might get done? I doubt it is a cheap thing to do, but I really think it could benefit designs with strangled potential. Better materials, proper bracing, curved sides etc.

    For magisters I have long thought of side firing woofers at floor level (a la audio physic) with a slim front baffle, perhaps with a decent cone midrange and tweeter upgrade (ATC or Ruark). The whole thing would need calculating for correct internal volume as the are infinite baffle, and would likely stand a metre and a half tall. In gloss piano white. Crossover design by our Col it even RFC, and I bet they would image nicely!
  • edited May 21
    Alan said:
    Nice, Ben.

    I've been idly toying with the notion of getting my loudspeaker cabinets rebuilt by someone with access to CNC facilities, is that something you might get done? I doubt it is a cheap thing to do, but I really think it could benefit designs with strangled potential. Better materials, proper bracing, curved sides etc.
    Thanks Alan. :-)
    I have learned from my recent, ad-hoc, experiment with bracing, how cabinets can effect sound. So I would be interested to learn more about different cabinet designs and constructions. As you suggest, things like CNC are expensive. My going about this from-scratch DIY build has been contingent on it being affordable to me, especially given that the speakers may have turned out to be rubbish (thankfully they haven't). Also, I'd have to learn how to do it.
    But, if I make another pair I may experiment with different materials and perhaps get a carpenter friend to help with more substantial bracing at the outset.

    Alan said:

    For magisters I have long thought of side firing woofers at floor level (a la audio physic) with a slim front baffle, perhaps with a decent cone midrange and tweeter upgrade (ATC or Ruark). The whole thing would need calculating for correct internal volume as the are infinite baffle, and would likely stand a metre and a half tall. In gloss piano white. Crossover design by our Col it even RFC, and I bet they would image nicely!
    I do like white speakers. Piano white would be classy. :-)
    You mention side firing woofers. Yes, this is something I have considered to allow for a narrower front baffle. In fact, I have thought about trying it with my DIY speakers (simply rotating them 90 degrees and drilling holes in the sides for the mid and tweeter. But I think I'll leave it for a future build. Don't want to spoil the existing cabinets).

    I agree about replacing the midrange on the Magister. The standard one is not the best (not sure if it's just its age or it whether even a new one would be poor). I replaced them with a sealed back cheapo Pyle driver and the improvement was massive. There's no internal enclosure for the midrange on the Magister, so unless one fits an internal enclosure (which would effect the volume of the woofer enclosure) it's got to be a sealed back midrange unit to avoid the pressure changes from the woofer effecting the midrange cone. I think I saw recently that Monacor now produce a sealed back unit. May look at that.

    Regarding internal volume, I agree it's important to get this right. For my DIY build I found on-line an old manual for Goodmans drivers that included information on the 18P that I used. It gave a clear figure for internal volume, which I used as one of the starting points for the cabinet design. IIRC the manual also stated that it was the volume that mattered, not so much the specific dimensions that determined it. If one wanted to rehouse a 15 inch Magister woofer, I suppose it would be fairly easy to calculate the internal volume of a standard Magister cabinet and then work out how slim the front baffle of a replacement cabinet would need to be if a metre and a half tall and 15 inches deep.

    I'd be interested to read any speaker build you do undertake Alan. I know we have similar aural tastes, so am always keen to read of your experiences.

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